JACC: Status of cardiovascular health in chinese adults

J Am Coll Cardiol. 2015 Mar 17;65(10):1013-25. doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2014.12.044.

Status of cardiovascular health in chinese adults.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Cardiovascular disease has become the leading cause of death in China.

OBJECTIVES:

The goal of this study was to evaluate the current status of cardiovascular health in Chinese adults.

METHODS:

Cardiovascular health data were collected from a nationally representative sample of 96,121 Chinese adults age ≥20 years in 2010. Idealcardiovascular health was defined according to the American Heart Association’s 2020 Strategic Impact Goals as follows: the simultaneous presence of 4 favorable health behaviors (ideal smoking status, ideal body mass index, physical activity at goal, and healthy dietary habits) and 4 favorablehealth factors (ideal smoking status, untreated total cholesterol <200 mg/dl, untreated blood pressure <120/<80 mm Hg, and untreated fasting plasma glucose <100 mg/dl) in the absence of a history of cardiovascular disease.

RESULTS:

The estimated percentage of ideal cardiovascular health was 0.2% in the general adult population in China (0.1% in men and 0.4% in women). An estimated 0.7% (0.4% in men and 1.0% in women) of Chinese adults had all 4 ideal health behaviors, and 13.5% (5.0% in men and 22.3% in women) had all 4 ideal health factors. Men most frequently had 3 to 4 ideal components, and women most commonly had 4 to 5 ideal components of the 7 cardiovascular health metrics. Ideal diet (1.6%) was the least common among all cardiovascular health metrics. Female sex and younger age were the 2 most common protective factors for cardiovascular health in Chinese adults.

CONCLUSIONS:

The percentage of ideal cardiovascular health in Chinese adults is extremely low. Both population-wide and high-risk strategies should be implemented with great effort to promote cardiovascular health in China.

Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

KEYWORDS:

China; cardiovascular disease; epidemiology; health status

PMID:
25766949
[PubMed – in process]

Author information

  • 1State Key Laboratory of Medical Genomics, Key Laboratory for Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases of Ministry of Health, National Clinical Research Center for Metabolic Diseases, Collaborative Innovation Center of Systems Biomedicine and Shanghai Clinical Center for Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases, Rui-Jin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao-Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.
  • 2National Center for Chronic and Noncommunicable Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing, China.
  • 3Department of Epidemiology, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana.
  • 4State Key Laboratory of Medical Genomics, Key Laboratory for Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases of Ministry of Health, National Clinical Research Center for Metabolic Diseases, Collaborative Innovation Center of Systems Biomedicine and Shanghai Clinical Center for Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases, Rui-Jin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao-Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China; Department of Epidemiology, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana.
  • 5Department of Pathology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.
  • 6State Key Laboratory of Medical Genomics, Key Laboratory for Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases of Ministry of Health, National Clinical Research Center for Metabolic Diseases, Collaborative Innovation Center of Systems Biomedicine and Shanghai Clinical Center for Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases, Rui-Jin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao-Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China. Electronic address: wqingw@hotmail.com.
  • 7National Center for Chronic and Noncommunicable Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing, China. Electronic address: linhong@chinawch.org.cn.
  • 8State Key Laboratory of Medical Genomics, Key Laboratory for Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases of Ministry of Health, National Clinical Research Center for Metabolic Diseases, Collaborative Innovation Center of Systems Biomedicine and Shanghai Clinical Center for Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases, Rui-Jin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao-Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China. Electronic address: gning@sibs.ac.cn.

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