Quantification of scientific output in cardiovascular medicine: a perspective based on global data.

Quantification of scientific output in cardiovascular medicine: a perspective based on global data.

EuroIntervention. 2013 Aug 26. pii: 20130130-05. [Epub ahead of print]

Quantification of scientific output in cardiovascular medicine: a perspective based on global data.

Source

Otamendi Hospital, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Abstract

Aims: We sought to explore whether global and regional scientific output in cardiovascular medicine are associated with economic variables and follow the same trend as medicine and as science overall. Methods and results: We registered the number of documents, number of citations, citations per document and the h-index for the first 50 countries according to the h-index (a measure to evaluate both the productivity and impact of the publications) in cardiovascular medicine. Economic variables (gross domestic product [GDP] per capita, % expenditure of the GDP in research and development [R&D] and health) were obtained from the World Bank, the UNESCO, and the World Health Organization. In total, the scientific output in cardiology showed the same position as in medicine and science overall (mean difference vs. medicine -0.9±5.3º, p=0.25 vs. science -0.7±5.3º, p=0.39). We found significant correlations between the h-index and the % GDP expenditure in R&D (r=0.67, p<0.001), and the % GDP expenditure in health (r=0.71, p<0.0001). Overall, there was a 21.4% (interquartile range 3.7; 55.0) increase in the % GDP expenditure in R&D between 1996 and 2007. Emerging economies showed the larger growth in % GDP expenditure in health and R&D. Conclusions: The global situation of scientific output in cardiovascular medicine is highly polarised and closely related to economic indicators. Emergent economies, with higher rates of GDP growth and increasingly larger expenditures for R&D and healthcare, are expected to show a visible escalation in the scientific global picture in the near future.

Recent advances in the epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment of endomyocardial fibrosis in Africa

Recent advances in the epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment of endomyocardial fibrosis in Africa

Heart 2013;99:1481-1487 doi:10.1136/heartjnl-2012-303193

  • Global burden of cardiovascular disease

Recent advances in the epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment of endomyocardial fibrosis in Africa

  1. Ana Olga H Mocumbi1
  2. Ayodele O Falase2

  1. 1Universidade Eduardo Mondlane and Instituto Nacional de Saúde, Maputo, Moçambique

  2. 2Department of Medicine, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria
  1. Correspondence toProfessor Ana Olga H Mocumbi, Department of Medicine, Universidade Eduardo Mondlane & Instituto Nacional de Saúde, Av Eduardo Mondlane 1008, PO Box 264, Maputo Moçambique;amocumbi@yahoo.com
  • Received 23 October 2012
  • Revised 3 March 2013
  • Accepted 10 March 2013
  • Published Online First 16 May 2013

Abstract

Endomyocardial fibrosis (EMF) continues to be an important and disabling disease in many parts of Africa, although its prevalence has declined in some parts of the continent. Increased access to medical care in general and increased availability of echocardiography in some parts of the continent have led to recognition of the disease in areas in which the disease had not been previously reported, and this has given new insights into its natural history. However, the early manifestations of EMF continue to elude clinicians and researchers, and no progress has been made in defining its aetiology. Advances have, however, been made in establishing the epidemiology and improving clinical diagnosis and management, through modern medical therapy and improved surgical techniques. Research is still required to define clinical, biological and echocardiographic markers of early stages of EMF, so that advances in the knowledge of its pathogenesis and pathophysiology can be made. This will hopefully determine preventive measures and avoid the burden of this debilitating condition in this continent.

CMR myocardial perfusion reserve index assessment in women with microvascular coronary dysfunction

CMR myocardial perfusion reserve index assessment in women with microvascular coronary dysfunction

Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging myocardial perfusion reserve index assessment in women with microvascular coronary dysfunction and reference controls

Authors: Chrisandra L. Shufelt, Louise E. J. Thomson, Pavel Goykhman, Megha Agarwal, Puja K. Mehta, Tara Sedlak, Ning Li, Edward Gill, Bruce Samuels, Babak Azabal, Saibal Kar, Kamlesh Kothawade, Margo Minissian, Piotr Slomka, Daniel S. Berman, C. Noel Bairey Merz

Abstract

Objective: We sought to comparatively assess cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) myocardial perfusion reserve index (MPRI) in women with confirmed microvascular coronary dysfunction (MCD) cases and reference control women.
Background: Women with signs or symptoms of myocardial ischemia in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) frequently have MCD which carries an adverse prognosis. Diagnosis involves invasive coronary reactivity testing (CRT). Adenosine CMRI is a non-invasive test that may be useful for the detection of MCD.
Methods: Fifty-three women with MCD confirmed by CRT and 12 age- and estrogen-use matched reference controls underwent adenosine CMRI. CMRI was assessed for MPRI, calculated using the ratio of myocardial blood flow at hyperemia/rest for the whole myocardium and separately for the 16 segments as defined by the American Heart Association. Statistical analysis was performed using repeated measures ANOVA models.
Results: Compared to reference controls, MCD cases had lower MPRI values globally and in subendocardial and subepicardial regions (1.63±0.39 vs. 1.98±0.38, P=0.007, 1.51±0.35 vs. 1.84±0.34, P=0.0045, 1.68±0.38 vs. 2.04±0.41, P=0.005, respectively). A perfusion gradient across the myocardium with lower MPRI in the subendocardium compared to the subepicardium was observed for both groups.
Conclusions: Women with MCD have lower MPRI measured by perfusion CMRI compared to reference controls. CMRI may be a useful diagnostic modality for MCD. Prospective validation of a diagnostic threshold for MPRI in patients with MCD is needed.

ASE clinical recommendations for imaging of patients with pericardial disease

ASE clinical recommendations for imaging of patients with pericardial disease

American society of echocardiography clinical recommendations for multimodality cardiovascular imaging of patients with pericardial disease: endorsed by the society for cardiovascular magnetic resonance and society of cardiovascular computed tomography.

Klein AL, Abbara S, Agler DA, Appleton CP, Asher CR, Hoit B, Hung J, Garcia MJ, Kronzon I, Oh JK, Rodriguez ER, Schaff HV, Schoenhagen P, Tan CD, White RD.

J Am Soc Echocardiogr. 2013 Sep;26(9):965-1012.e15. doi: 10.1016/j.echo.2013.06.023. No abstract available.

PMID:
23998693

Prognostic value of stress cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Prognostic value of stress cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

J Am Coll Cardiol. 2013 Aug 27;62(9):826-38. doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2013.03.080. Epub 2013 May 30.

Prognostic value of stress cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Source

Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, Virginia.